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Values at stake: autonomy, responsibility, and trustworthiness in relation to genetic testing and personalized nutrition advice
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
Stockholm Centre of Healthcare Ethics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
Department of Philosophy, Ethics Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
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2013 (English)In: Genes & Nutrition, ISSN 1555-8932, E-ISSN 1865-3499, Vol. 8, no 4, 365-372 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Personalized nutrition has the potential to enhance individual health control. It could be seen as a means to strengthen people’s autonomy as they learn more about their personal health risks, and receive dietary advice accordingly. We examine in what sense personalized nutrition strengthens or weakens individual autonomy. The impact of personalized nutrition on autonomy is analyzed in relation to responsibility and trustworthiness. On a societal level, individualization of health promotion may be accompanied by the attribution of extended individual responsibility for one’s health. This constitutes a dilemma of individualization, caused by a conflict between the right to individual freedom and societal interests. The extent to which personalized nutrition strengthens autonomy is consequently influenced by how responsibility for health is allocated to individuals. Ethically adequate allocation of responsibility should focus on prospective responsibility and be differentiated with regard to individual differences concerning the capacity of adults to take responsibility. The impact of personalized nutrition on autonomy also depends on its methodological design. Owing to the complexity of information received, personalized nutrition through genetic testing (PNTGT) is open to misinterpretation and may not facilitate informed choices and autonomy. As new technologies, personalized nutrition and PNTGT are subject to issues of trust. To strengthen autonomy, trust should be approached in terms of trustworthiness. Trustworthiness implies that an organization that develops or introduces personalized nutrition can show that it is competent to deal with both the technical and moral dimensions at stake and that its decisions are motivated by the interests and expectations of the truster.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013. Vol. 8, no 4, 365-372 p.
Keyword [en]
Personalized nutrition, Ethics, Autonomy, Responsibility, Trustworthiness
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20857DOI: 10.1007/s12263-013-0337-7ISI: 000320733200005Local ID: HHJADULTIS, HHJÅldrandeIS, HLKövrigtISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-20857DiVA: diva2:611927
Projects
Food4Me
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme
Note

This study was conducted on behalf of the Food4Me project.Food4Me is the acronym of the EU FP7 project: “Personalised nutrition: an integrated analysis of opportunities and challenges” (Contract no. KBBE.2010.2.3-02, Project no. 265494). The parties involved in the project are listed on the project’s web site http://www.food4me.org/. Project coordination was carried out at University College Dublin, Ireland, Institute of Food and Health; Project Coordinator: Professor Michael J. Gibney, Project Manager: Dr. Marianne Walsh. For overall correspondence regarding the Food4Me project: Professor Michael J Gibney, UCD Institute of Food and Health, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, Tel: +353 (1) 716 2824, e-mail: mike.gibney@ucd.i.e.

Available from: 2013-03-19 Created: 2013-03-19 Last updated: 2016-09-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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