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Malawian Prosthetic And Orthotic Users’ Performance And Satisfaction With Their Lower Limb Assistive Device
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
Lund University.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9042-4832
2013 (English)Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This study aimed to investigate patients’ performance and satisfaction with their lower limb prosthetic or orthotic device and their satisfaction with prosthetic and orthotic service delivery in Malawi.

Method: Eighty-three patients participated in the study. Questionnaires were used to collect self- reported data.

Result: Ninety per cent of prosthetic and orthotic devices were in use. Patients were quite satisfied with their device (mean score of 3.9 out of 5) and very satisfied with the service provided (mean score of 4.4 out of 5). The majority of patients were able to move around the home (80%), rise from a chair (77%), walk on uneven ground (59%) and travel by bus or car (56%). Patients had difficulties or could not walk at all on; stairs (60%) and hills (79%),Thirty-nine percent reported pain when using the assistive device. Forty-eight percent of the devices were in use but needed repairs and 10 % were never used or completely broken. Access to repairs and servicing were rated by patients as most important, followed by durability of the device and follow up services. Lack of finances to pay for transport was a common barrier to accessing the prosthetic and orthotic centre.

Discussion: Prosthetic and orthotic devices can be further improved in order to accommodate for ambulation on uneven surfaces, hills and stairs, as well as increasing patients’ ability to walk long distances with reduced pain.

Conclusion:Patients were satisfied with the device and service received and the majority of prosthetic and orthotic patients in this study reported increased mobility when using their assistive devices. However, patients reported pain associated with use of the device and difficulties were experienced when walking in hills and on stairs. Costs associated with transport to the prosthetic and orthotic facility prevented them from receiving follow-up and repair services

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20722OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-20722DiVA: diva2:608989
Conference
ISPO 2013 World Congress Inclusion, Participation & Empowerment 4th-7th February,Hyderabad India
Available from: 2013-03-03 Created: 2013-03-03 Last updated: 2016-06-30

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