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Waving or drowning? Managing resource constraints in entrepreneurial firm with bricolage as a response to the global financial crisis
Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6363-1382
Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

These are challenging times for new entrepreneurial firms. The development of the Global Financial Crisis shook the very foundations of global markets and institutions that most firms relied on to do business (Claessens, et al., forthcoming). In the midst of institutional flux and resource constraints, entrepreneurial firms, which have been shown to make a range of contributions to the economy (van Praag & Versloot 2007) faced increasing constraints. The Australian Federal Government quickly implemented the Green Loan program in response to the financial crisis. Unfortunately, the green loans program was flawed with obsolete processes and information (Faulkner, 2011), further constraining new firms. Prior research provides few clues regarding how resource-constrained entrepreneurial firms deal with these institutional flaws within institutional change and how they might overcome these challenges and prosper.

One promising theory that evaluates behavioural responses to constraints and institutional flaws is bricolage (Levi Strauss, 1967). Bricolage aligns with notions of resourcefulness: defined here as “making do by applying combinations of the resources at hand to new problems and opportunities” (Baker and Nelson 2005: 333). Using three case studies, we consider how institutional flaws impact firm behaviours and illustrate the use of bricolage in attempts to reinforce, shape and change the GL program further extending bricolage domains of Baker and Nelson (2005).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20482OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-20482DiVA: diva2:600767
Conference
2012 Babson College Entrepreneurial Research Conference, 6-9 July 2012, Fort Worth, Texas.
Available from: 2013-01-25 Created: 2013-01-25 Last updated: 2015-12-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf