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Age and Sex Differences in the Relation between Education and Physical and Cognitive Functioning among Men and Women Aged 76 Years and Older
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
2012 (English)In: International Journal of behavioral medicine, 19, Issue S1: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting, New York: Springer, 2012, 224- p.Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The socioeconomic position (SEP) and health association is well studied; less is known about how the association varies with age. We study how the relation between education and physical and cognitive functioning vary by age.

Methods: A nationally representative random sample of Swedes aged 76+ years was interviewed in 2010/2011 (n=890) (non-response 14%). Men aged 80+ years and women 85+ were over sampled. (Sampling weights was used to control for this.)

Physical functioning was measured by tests of lung function (peak flow), performance (9 tests of strength, range of motion, etc), and vision, and self-reported mobility (walking 500m, 100m, stairs, running 100m).

Cognition was measured by the MMSE and a test of everyday competence.

Global self-rated health (GSRH) was included as a comparison.

Education was measured as number of years of education.

Results: Significant associations were found between higher education and better function (and better global self-rated health) for all indicators. All associations to education decreased with age except vision that only decreased for men. The associations between education and performance, mobility, everyday competence, and GSRH decreased more with age among women. The associations between education and lung functioning and MMSE decreased more with age among men.

Conclusions: Age patterns in the associations between education and functioning differ by indicator. In general education’s relation to both physical functioning and cognitive functioning and global self-rated health seems to decrease with age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2012. 224- p.
Series
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19942DOI: 10.1007/s12529-012-9247-0OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-19942DiVA: diva2:572803
Conference
12th International Congress of Behavioral Medicine, 29 August – 1 September 2012, Hungary
Available from: 2012-11-28 Created: 2012-11-28 Last updated: 2015-09-07Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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