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Recent trends in complex health problems in the oldest old in Sweden 1992-2010
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
2012 (English)In: The Gerontologist, 52, Issue S1: 2012 GSA Annual Scientific Meeting Abstracts / [ed] Rachel Pruchno, PhD, Washington: Gerontological society , 2012, p. 329-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Studies addressing multiple morbid conditions in elderly populationsusually focus on disease and physiological indicators relevant forthe medical care system. Few studies include both medical and functionalindicators, which together indicate the need for integrated carefrom different providers of medical and long-term care (home-help,institutional care) as well as informal caregivers. When assessing eldercareneeds and the wellbeing of the oldest old, trends of complex healthproblems seem more useful than single health items that may followdiverse trends over time. This study identified severe problems in threehealth domains (health items/symptoms, mobility, cognition/communication)in three nationally representative samples of the Swedish populationaged 77+, including institutionalized people and proxy interviewsfor those who were too frail to be interviewed themselves. Peoplewith severe problems in two/three domains were considered havingcomplex health problems. Changes in the proportion of people withcomplex health problems between 1992, 2002 and 2010 were analysedwith logistic regressions as well as differences according to age, gender,and education. Results showed a significant increase of elderly peoplewith complex health problems from 19% in 1992 to 26% in 2002.Between 2002 and 2010/11 there has been no significant change. Gender,age and education had significant independent effects on the oddsof having complex health problems. Patterns were similar for men andwomen. From a social policy perspective, stable prevalence rates ofcomplex health problems among the oldest old since 2002 emphasizethe continuing need for extensive collaboration between medical andsocial services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington: Gerontological society , 2012. p. 329-
Series
The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19925DOI: 10.1093/geront/gns201OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-19925DiVA, id: diva2:572623
Conference
The 65rd Annual Meeting of The Gerontological Society of America. November 14-18, 2012, San Diego, California, USA
Available from: 2012-11-28 Created: 2012-11-28 Last updated: 2015-09-07Bibliographically approved

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Kåreholt, Ingemar

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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