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Socieconomic position, mobility, and political participation among men and women 77+ in Sweden
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
2012 (English)Conference paper, Poster (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Political participation, e.g. voting, is important as itallows people to influence national/regional politics. From an egalitarianperspective it is desirable that everyone, irrespective of age, sex,socioeconomic position, and health, has the possibility to vote. We studythe relationship between voting and a combination of mobility and threemeasures of socioeconomic position (social class based on occupation,years of education, and income). Methods: Two nationally representativeSwedish samples aged 53-75 were interviewed in 1968 and 1981respectively. Survivors from 1968 where re-interviewed in 1992 (n=461),survivors from 1981 in 2002 (n=614). Both 1992 and 2002 were electionyears in Sweden. The question posed was: did you vote in the election?Logistic regressions were controlled for sex, age, and cognition.Mobility, measured as walking aids outdoors was coded: 1)no aids;2)some aids (cane(s), quadruped(s), crutch(es), walker); 3)wheelchair/never go out. Results: Significant differences in voting were foundfor both sexes, for all measures of socioeconomic position – people witha high socioeconomic position being more likely to have voted. Theassociation between voting and socioeconomic position varied overmobility, but not systematically: social class had the strongest associationamong men without walking aids; education among men using someaids; and income for men using a wheelchair/not going out. Social classand income had the strongest associations among women with someaids, education among women without aids. Conclusions: There are systematicsocioeconomic differences in political participation measuredby voting, but no systematic pattern in how the associations vary overmobility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19923OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-19923DiVA: diva2:572619
Conference
The 65rd Annual Meeting of The Gerontological Society of America. San Diego, California, USA
Available from: 2012-11-28 Created: 2012-11-28 Last updated: 2013-01-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf