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Content and distribution of discursive space in consultations between patients with atrial fibrillation and healthcare professionals
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3817-4981
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1873-1953, E-ISSN 1474-5151, Vol. 12, no 1, 47-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe (i) the topics participants talk about, (ii) the use of discursive space in consultations between patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and their nurses and physicians, and (iii) the frequencies of the ways the patients, nurses and physicians introduce the topics.

Methods: Data were collected from 23 videotaped consultations concerning patients with AF as well as physicians and nurses, respectively. To obtain a description of topics discussed, the transcripts were analysed using content analysis. The patterns of dominance for the respective topic and participant were explored from the framework of analysis that treats dominance.

Results: Four topics were used by both nurses and physicians in the consultations. These were ‘pathophysiology’, ‘diagnostic procedures’, ‘treatment’ and ‘activity’. In the nurse–patient consultation an additional topic, ‘routines related to the physician’s responsibilities’, emerged. With respect to the number of words and turns, the distribution of the discourse space was almost equal between the nurses and patients and unequal between the physicians and patients. The healthcare professionals initiated the topics more frequently compared to the patients, whereby the medical approach recommended in the guidelines for AF could be recognized. The patients were the dominating initiators in the topic ‘activity’, which refers to the adaptation of activities in daily life in relation to the AF.

Conclusions: The medical-driven agenda dominates over the patient-driven agenda in consultations between healthcare professional and patients with AF. The patients initiated the conversations when discussing living with AF and were more talkative during conversations in nurse consultations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 12, no 1, 47-55 p.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19822DOI: 10.1177/1474515111430894PubMedID: 22357787OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-19822DiVA: diva2:567798
Available from: 2012-11-14 Created: 2012-11-14 Last updated: 2015-06-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Communication Patterns in Consultations Between Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Health Professionals
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication Patterns in Consultations Between Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Health Professionals
2012 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

Patients’ preferences, needs and desires are important when discussing treatment. In consultations between patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and health professionals, knowledge, understanding and insight about communication patterns are of vital importance for strengthening patient involvement in decision-making about their care and treatment.

Aim

The general aim of this thesis was to describe communication patterns in consultations between patients with AF and health professionals.

Specific aims

(1) To describe (i) the topics patients with AF and their nurses and physicians discuss; (ii) the use of discursive space in consultations between these participants; and (iii) the frequencies with which patients and nurses/physicians introduce the identified topics.

(2) To describe the types of patient resistance to accepting treatment with warfarin and how cardiologists respond to such resistance.

Methods

An inductive design was used. In study I, the sample consisted of 23 consultations between patients with AF (13 women and 10 men) and health professionals (5 women and 5 men) who were employed in six different cardiologic outpatient clinics. Content analysis was used to obtain a description of topics discussed. The patterns of dominance for the various topics and participant were explored from the framework of an analysis of dominance (I). In study II, the sample consisted of 11 consultations between patients with AF (7 women and 4 men) and cardiologists (2 women and 3 men). Conversation analysis was used to describe interactions concerning resistance to treatment with warfarin.

Findings

Study I. Four topics were introduced by both nurses and physicians during the consultations. These were “pathophysiology”, “treatment”, “diagnostic procedures”, and “activity”. In the nurse–patient consultations an additional topic, “routines related to the physician’s responsibilities”, emerged. With respect to the number of words and turns, the distribution of the discourse space was almost equal between nurses and patients, and unequal between physicians and patients. The patients were the dominant initiators of the topic “activity”, which refers to adaptation of activities in daily life in relation to AF.

Study II. There were four types of patient resistance to accepting treatment with warfarin. These included “Giving reasons for their resistance”, “Suggesting other treatment options”, “Stating treatment preferences” and “Questioning or challenging the cardiologist’s treatment recommendations”. The cardiologists’ responses to the patients’ resistance included “Repeating the treatment recommendation”, “Negotiation with the patient”, “Providing additional information about the recommended treatment” and “Extending their explanation of the purpose of the treatment”.

Conclusions

The medical-driven agenda dominated over the patient-driven agenda in consultations between health care professionals and patients with AF. During conversations in consultations with nurses, the patients initiated discussion of living with AF and were more talkative than they were with physicians. An awareness of types of patient resistance to treatment would enable cardiologists to consider patients’ experience-based views about their treatment;

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: School of Health Science, 2012. 96 p.
Series
Hälsohögskolans avhandlingsserie, ISSN 1654-3602 ; 35
Keyword
Atrial fibrillation, communication, consultation, dominance, patient participation, resistance interaction, shared decision-making, warfarin
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19834 (URN)978-91-85835-34-8 (ISBN)
Presentation
2012-12-14, Forum Humanum, HHJ (School of Health Sciences), 09:30
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-11-22 Created: 2012-11-16 Last updated: 2012-12-04Bibliographically approved

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