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First-line managers’ experiences of alternative modes of funding in elderly care in Sweden
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 737-747Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe first-line managers’ experiences of alternative modes of funding elderly care in two communities in western Sweden.

 Background: A growing elderly population demands alternative modes of funding elderly care for better outcomes for patients and better efficiency as it is publicly funded through taxation.

 Methods: The study comprised a total of eight semi-structured interviews with first-line managers working within elderly care. The interviews were analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Respect for the individuals was a main concern in the study.

 Results: One category, quality improvement, and four subcategories freedom of choice, organisational structure, quality awareness and market forces effects were identified to describe first-line managers’ experiences of the operation of elderly care.

 Conclusions: Quality improvement was an important factor to deal with when elderly care was operated in different organisational perspectives, either private or public. The first-line manager is a key person for developing a learning organisation that encourages both staff, clients and their relatives to improve the organisation. Moreover, person-centred care strengthens the client’s role in the organisation, which is in line with the government’s goal for the quality improvement of elderly care. However, further research is needed on how quality improvement could be developed when different caregivers operate in the same market in order to improve care from the elderly perspective.

Implications for nursing management: This study highlights alternative modes of funding elderly care. The economical perspectives should not dominate without taking care of quality improvement when the operation of elderly care is planned and implemented. Strategies such as a learning organisational structure built on person-centred care could create quality improvement in elderly care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 20, no 6, p. 737-747
Keywords [en]
alternative modes of funding, elderly care, first-line manager, person-centred care, quality improvement
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-19737DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2834.2012.01464.xISI: 000308640800003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-19737DiVA, id: diva2:563978
Available from: 2012-11-01 Created: 2012-11-01 Last updated: 2018-07-16Bibliographically approved

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Rosengren, Kristina

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