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Culture City
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4560-1905
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
2011 (English)In: Journal of Town and City Management, ISSN 1756-9538, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 246-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Culture and creativity have been seen as catalysts for social change, urban diversity and revitalisation of neighbourhoods by thinkers such as Richard Florida and Charles Landry. The creative and cultural sectors are also viewed as essential parts of urban economies, both as factors attracting population and as a dynamic part of the economy with strong growth. This means that these sectors stimulate economic growth in cities in several ways. From descriptive statistics one knows that occupation in the creative and cultural sectors is spatially concentrated in large metropolitan regions. This observation, and other theoretical arguments, stress that the performance and growth of these sectors should be assumed to be dependent on agglomeration economies. In this analysis, the authors examine the relationship between spatial distribution and growth of occupation, in a sample of people working in the creative and cultural sectors, in relation to growth in cities in Sweden. One interesting finding from the empirical analysis is that, when the authors analyse differences between the core and peripheral parts of functional regions, they find that there are no real signs of significant differences between them. In particular, they find that in the peripheral municipalities (suburbs) that surround the core municipalities, the occupation in the creative and cultural sectors is more correlated to population growth in these municipalities than proximity to creative and cultural occupation in the core parts of the functional regions. From a policy perspective, this means that investments in culture not only matter for the biggest cities and city centres, but also for the medium and smaller-sized regions, as well as the suburbs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 2, no 3, p. 246-262
Keywords [en]
culture, regional development, city size, growth
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17493OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-17493DiVA, id: diva2:485943
Available from: 2012-01-30 Created: 2012-01-30 Last updated: 2015-11-10Bibliographically approved

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Mellander, CharlottaPettersson, LarsÖner, Özge

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