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Transition States in Africa: A Comparative Study: The Case of Ghana & Zambia
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Political Science.
2007 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background & Problem

The author believes that there are important lessons to be

learned from the states in Africa that have managed to achieve successful transitions from

one-party regimes to multy-party regimes. However, Africa today displays countries that

suffer from enormous problems and many of them are mired in political and economical

development. A main theme of this thesis is the search for the differences, how can we

explain the transitions and the outcomes of them?

Purpose

The purpose of this thesis is to describe the nature of transitions as Bratton

& de Walle explain them and to see if their suggested explanations hold true in Ghana &

Zambia. A secondary purpose also includes a comparison between the two cases and the

differences between them.

Method

A combination of a traditional literature study and a focused comparative

study has been used in order to fulfil the purpose.

Theoretical Framework

The second, third, fourth and fifth chapter represent the

bulk of the theoretical framework. The theories stem from Bratton & de Walle and will be

weighted against the empirical information found in the two cases.

Analysis & Conclusions

The latter chapters of this thesis summarize the results from

the comparison and include a discussion and comment chapter. The conclusion argues that

the causes and results of a transition to a large extent can be found in the political. The

phases that Bratton & de Walle describe are also accurate in relation to the two cases. An

important feature that Ghana has been successful with is that they have managed to

withhold a higher political activity throughout their democratization. This has in turn

resulted in a better outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. , p. 65
Keywords [en]
Transition, Liberalization, Democratization, Ghana, Zambia
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-994OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-994DiVA, id: diva2:4757
Uppsok
samhälle/juridik
Supervisors
Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-12

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