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Degenerative changes of the temporomandibular joint. Relationship to ethnicity, sex and occlusal supporting zones based on a skull material
Public Dental Health, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping , Sweden.
Futurum, The Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County, Jönköping , Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
2012 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, Vol. 70, no 3, 207-212 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. The first aim of this study was to examine a contemporary human skull material for possible ethnic differences in respect of degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). A second aim was to see if there was any correlation between such changes and occlusal support in any of the two groups and, if so, if this correlation was sex-related. Materials and methods: The material consisted of 129 Caucasian skulls and 76 skulls from Afro-Americans. Ninety-four of the Caucasian skulls came from males (73%) and the corresponding figure for the Afro-Americans was 40 (53%). Their mean age at death was 46 years (range: 19–89 years) and 37 years (range: 18–70 years), respectively. Results. Dental status was in general poor and 13% of the Afro-Americans and 26% of the Caucasians were edentulous. Form and surface changes of the TMJs were more common in the present material compared to most previous studies. No differences could be found between the two ethnic groups in respect of degenerative joint changes in the TMJs. In men, no correlation of clinical relevance could be found between severity of joint changes and occlusal support. However, in both Caucasian and Afro-American women, such a correlation was obvious, especially in higher age. Conclusions. The present findings give no evidence for any differences in the prevalence of degenerative changes in the TMJs in Caucasians and Afro-Americans. The strong correlation found between such changes and occlusal support in women but not in men might be explained by hormonal differences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 70, no 3, 207-212 p.
Keyword [en]
ethnicity, human skulls, osteoarthrosis, TMJ
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-16984DOI: 10.3109/00016357.2011.629628OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-16984DiVA: diva2:471222
Available from: 2012-01-02 Created: 2012-01-02 Last updated: 2013-09-19Bibliographically approved

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