Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sports Fans, ICT’s and Informal Learning of Civic Culture
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
2011 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Civic culture refers to cultural patterns in which the foundations for civic agency are embedded. Furthermore, civic culture highlights those features that serve as preconditions for people’s actual participation in the public sphere. The features in question Dahlgren has pointed out as six dimensions: knowledge, values, trust, spaces, practices and identities, all of which can serve as empirical entry points into the study of citizens’ engagement and participation. In this paper one of the key practices of civic culture will be examined, namely discussion. Taking on Putnam’s acknowledgment of non-political associations and networks, an internet community of sports fans is examined with regard to how the participants maintain the quality of their online discussion in order to warrant the survival of the conversation. The overarching aim has been to draw nearer to whether such endeavour potentially facilitates an informal learning of civic culture.

 

The data was drawn from a content analysis of 3993 messages posted to the hockey fan community HVfantasten.com  during 149 days, spread over three seasons of the Swedish Premier League of ice hockey. One of four grand subject matters on the agenda was the debate itself, i.e. a meta debate keeping a close check on the quality of the discussion by commenting on violations of the norms. This subject matter, consisting of 400 messages, constituted the basic data for the analyses.

 

Drawing on Habermas’ theory of universal pragmatics and McLaughlin’s et al conceptualization of netiquette, an analytical tool was constructed, distinguishing easy violations of the discussion standard from severe violations jeopardizing the basic foundations for common understanding. The distribution of critical comments on easy respectively severe violations was used  for measuring to what extent the maintaining of standard facilitates civic culture: emphasis on easy violations was perceived a low facilitating factor, and vice versa, emphasis on severe violations a potentially high facilitating impact on informal learning of civic culture among participators and readers in the sports fan community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keywords [en]
Civic culture, participation, internet community, sports fans, informal learning
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-16873OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-16873DiVA, id: diva2:466771
Conference
Civic Cultures, Lund, Sweden, March 31st, 2011
Available from: 2011-12-16 Created: 2011-12-16 Last updated: 2012-10-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Svensson, Anders

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Svensson, Anders
By organisation
HLK, Media and communication science
Media and Communications

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 269 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf