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Literacy as a Tool for Self-Authoring
Örebro universitet, institutionen för pedagogik, HumUS. (LIMCUL)
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Through its family, interests, school and the whole world around it every child participate in social and cultural practices where a whole range of literacies take place. Children have both shared and differing experiences of written language; every child has its unique patterns and unique lingual resources. This together with changed reading habits, higher demands and declining results, according to national and international surveys, generates new questions for literacy education. An overall aim with this ongoing study is to analyze the use of written language, in and outside school, in relation to meaning making. The study takes a hermeneutic and postcolonial point of departure together with theories from New Literacy Research[1]. From a hermeneutic perspective new knowledge takes its start from the acquainted and from a post-colonial perspective it is crucial to speak and tell your own narrative. How this can be linked with literacy is the content of this paper. Literacy is seen as a means to speak up, express oneself, speak against and speak with and hence as a necessary condition for human rights. From the above theoretical stand points within an ethnographical approach, the mentioned study aims to observe, analyze and understand the use of written language in relation to meaning making. The methods consist of participant observations, group activities and interviews. This paper will explore the complexity of literacy from different children’s perspectives in line with the above theoretical stand points.

 

 

 

[1]Within New Literacies Studies (NLS) researchers like Heath (1983), Street (1984), Barton (1994) and Gee (1996) have given important contributions. NLS has developed further through edited volumes by Street (1993, Barton & Hamilton (1998) and Barton, Hamilton & Ivanic (2000).

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keyword [en]
literacy, meaning-making, self-authoring, human right
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-15674OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-15674DiVA: diva2:430349
Conference
Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA/NFPF) Rights and Education Congress 10-12 March 2011, University of Jyväskylä
Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2011-07-08 Last updated: 2012-01-12

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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