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Cross-cultural aspects of learning technology acceptance
Ludwig-Maximiliams-Universitat, München, Germany.
Saarland University, Germany.
Saarland University, Germany.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2923-9034
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2011 (English)Conference paper, Presentation (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Education in a global networked society implies the wide use of educational technology, which in turn requires learners’ technology acceptance. The previous educational research has given little attention to the acceptance and use of learning technology in international or intercultural context. In this symposium, we present three empirical studies of technology acceptance by adult learners. All three are based on an acknowledged acceptance theory (i.e. the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology, UTAUT, Venkatesh et al., 2003), and aim at applying it in contexts where different cultures are involved. The first deals with the introduction of a virtual learning environment at a Swedish, a Norwegian, and a Lithuanian university. The second examines the use of a learning management system at a Spanish university, distinguishing technological from non-technological culture as context of the technology use. The third is a large survey of general attitudes and use of computers for learning in Germany and Romania, considering both ethnical and professional culture. In each of them, the findings widely correspond with the previous acceptance theories, i.e. learners’ expectations and the social influence determine their attitudes, which further determine the technology usage. Additionally, the cultural diversity highlights influences such as, e.g., individualism, uncertainty avoidance or computer anxiety, which can change both the values of the acceptance variables, and the relationships between them. Based on these evidences, the three studies provide a deeper insight into the interconnections between culture – in the national/ethnical, as well as in the professional sense – and learning technology acceptance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keyword [en]
Educational technology, multimedia and hypermedia learning, technology in education and training
National Category
Information Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-14744OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-14744DiVA: diva2:402045
Conference
14th Biennial Conference Earli, 30 August - 3 September 2011, Exeter, UNITED KINGDOM
Available from: 2011-03-05 Created: 2011-03-05 Last updated: 2015-03-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf