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Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries: A 10-year follow-up
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
2011 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 43, 323-329 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective and design: Long-term consequences of mild traumatic brain injuries were investigated based on a 10-year follow-up of patients from a previously published randomized controlled study of mild traumatic brain injuries. One aim was to describe changes over time after mild traumatic brain injuries in terms of the extent of persisting post-concussion symptoms, life satisfaction, perceived health, activities of daily living, changes in life roles and sick leave. Another aim was to identify differences between the intervention and control groups.

Patients: The intervention group comprised 142 persons and the control group 56 persons.

Methods: Postal questionnaires with a response rate of 56%.

Results: No differences over time were found for the intervention and control groups in terms of post-concussion symptoms. In the intervention group some variables in life satisfaction, perceived health and daily life were decreased. Some roles had changed over the years for both groups. No other differences between the intervention and control groups were found. However, in both groups sick leave decreased.

Conclusion: Early individual intervention by a qualified rehabilitation team does not appear to impact on the long-term outcome for persons with symptoms related to mild traumatic brain injuries. The status after approximately 3 weeks is indicative of the status after 10 years.

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 43, 323-329 p.
Keyword [en]
brain concussion, brain injuries, traumatic, post-concussion symptoms, quality of life, rehabilitation, intervention studies, RCT
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-14306DOI: 10.2340/16501977-0666OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-14306DiVA: diva2:387466
Available from: 2011-01-14 Created: 2011-01-14 Last updated: 2011-02-23Bibliographically approved

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Elgmark Andersson, ElisabethFalkmer, Torbjörn
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