Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Patterns of background factors related to early RA patients' conceptions of the causes of their disease
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
Show others and affiliations
2011 (English)In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 30, no 3, 347-352 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to identify patterns of background factors related to the early RA patients' conceptions of the cause of the disease. Conceptions from a qualitative study formed the basis for the stratification of 785 patients from the Swedish EIRA study answering a question about their own thoughts about the cause to RA. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the associations between patients' conceptions and relevant background factors: sex, age, civil status, educational level, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP) and smoking habits. The results were presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A conception of family-related strain was strongly associated with being young (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.33-0.78 for age 58-70 vs. 17-46), female (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.25-0.60 for male vs. female) and having a high level of education (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.54-3.01 for university degree vs. no degree). A conception of being exposed to climate changes was associated with being male (OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.24-3.22 for male vs. female), having a low level of education (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.58 for university degree vs. no degree) and positive Anti-CCP (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.03-2.87 for positive vs. negative Anti-CCP). Linking patients' conceptions of the cause of their RA to background factors potentially could create new opportunities for understanding the complexity of the aetiology in RA. Furthermore, this information is important and relevant in the care of patients with early RA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 30, no 3, 347-352 p.
Keyword [en]
Pathogenesis, Patient perspective, Rheumatoid arthritis, Risk factors
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-14251DOI: 10.1007/s10067-010-1556-6PubMedID: 20734214OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-14251DiVA: diva2:384512
Available from: 2011-01-10 Created: 2011-01-10 Last updated: 2012-07-30Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Patients' and healthcare providers' experiences of the cause, management and interaction in the care of rheumatoid arthritis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' and healthcare providers' experiences of the cause, management and interaction in the care of rheumatoid arthritis
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to explore and describe patients’ and healthcare providers’ experiences of the causes, management and interaction in the care of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Method: The thesis is based on four studies. Studies I and II contain data from an epidemiologic project involving patients who were recently diagnosed with RA. The patients answered an open-ended question about their conception of the cause of their RA (Study I). Qualitative data from 38 patients were analysed using the phenomenographic approach in order to identify variation in conceptions. The results of Study I formed the basis for categorizing the conceptions of 785 patients in the search for patterns of background factors (Study II). Study III aimed to explore how patients experienced their management of RA in everyday life. Data were collected by interviews with 16 patients and analysed according to Grounded Theory (GT). In study IV, the aim was to explore healthcare providers’ experiences of their interaction with patients’ management of RA. Data were collected by interviews with 18 providers representing different professions and analysed using GT. Findings:  Patients’ conceptions of the cause of their RA revealed new aspects from the patient perspective that can complement pathogenetic models. Two descriptive categories emerged: consequences beyond personal control and overloaded circumstances, which included six categories of conceptions (Study I). The most common conceptions of the cause of RA were unexpected effects of events followed by work and family-related stress (Study II). Background factors that influenced the conceptions of the cause were age, sex and educational level. Patient management of RA involved using personal resources together with grasping for support from others in their striving for a good life. When linking these aspects together, four ways of management emerged: mastering, struggling, relying and being resigned (Study III). Healthcare providers’ experiences of their interaction with patients’ management shed light upon the important issue of delivering knowledge and advice. The providers’ attitudes constituted one cornerstone and patients’ responses the other. The providers reported that the interaction led to different outcomes: completed delivery, adjusted delivery and failed delivery. Conclusions: The findings contribute new knowledge from both patients’ and healthcare providers’ perspectives, which could be used to develop a more person-centred approach in rheumatology care. Person-centred care involves taking patients’ beliefs and values into account in addition to creating a trusting relationship between patient and provider. A successful person-centred approach requires an organisation that supports the person-centred framework.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: School of Health Sciences, 2011. 77 p.
Series
Hälsohögskolans avhandlingsserie, ISSN 1654-3602 ; 23
Keyword
Rheumatoid arthritis, patient perspective, self-management, illness perception, patient-provider interaction, provider perspective, person-centred care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-16740 (URN)978-91-85835-22-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-12-09, Forum Humanum, Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, 10:30 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-11-17 Created: 2011-11-17 Last updated: 2011-11-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bergsten, UlrikaFridlund, Bengt
By organisation
HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social workHHJ, Dep. of Nursing ScienceHHJ. ADULT
In the same journal
Clinical Rheumatology
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 404 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf