Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Triple Helix Networks in a Multicultural Context: Triggers and Barriers for Fostering Growth and Sustainability
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management).
Show others and affiliations
2008 (English)In: Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1084-9467, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 77-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article deals with Triple Helix (university, industry and government co-operation) from an institutional theory perspective. The empirical context is the Western Cape Region in South Africa and the focus is entrepreneurship development. The purpose is twofold: first, the existing Triple Helix model is adapted to the South African context; and second, facilities and impediments for working according to Triple Helix in South Africa are identified. The empirical material consists of a survey and three longitudinal case studies illustrating the degree of co-operation between the three parties. The article contributes to knowledge about how the Triple Helix model works on a regional level in a developing country. The study draws the following conclusions: when co-operation is to be identified between the three actors, only two of the three are involved; one missing link in the Triple Helix model is the focus on the entrepreneur; co-operation between the three parties are incidental rather than planned and there is lack of structure. In turn, some of these conclusions may be an effect of institutional changes on a national level. For a normative legacy, the article proposes a set of suggestions for incorporating all relevant parties on a practical level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 13, no 1, p. 77-98
Keywords [en]
conformal mapping, Schwarz–Christoffel mapping, smooth boundary curve, zipper, geodesic algorithm, entrepreneurship development, Triple Helix model, institutional theory, emerging economies
National Category
Computational Mathematics Computational Mathematics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-5318OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-5318DiVA, id: diva2:36138
Available from: 2008-07-08 Created: 2008-07-08 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Brundin, EthelWigren, CarolineVisser, Kobus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Brundin, EthelWigren, CarolineVisser, Kobus
By organisation
JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management)JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership
In the same journal
Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship
Computational MathematicsComputational Mathematics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 497 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf