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Comparison of oxygen consumption while walking on treadmill wearing MBT Shoes versus Orthopedic Shoes: A treatise on shoe mass
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
2009 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate if there was any difference in energy expenditure (kcal/min) and oxygen consumption (VO2) between subjects walking with Masai Barefoot Technology ® (MBT) shoes and regular orthopedic shoes. The research hypothesis was that MBT shoes demand more energy expenditure than regular orthopedic shoes.

Methods: Seven women aged 49-65 were recruited for the study. The subjects were tested in two sessions, with a minimum of two weeks in between each sesssion. On each test session the subjects walked with both MBT shoes and orthopedic shoes which were adjusted in mass (g) to match the mass of the MBT shoes. While the subjects walked on a treadmill, the oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (min-1) and self selected velocity (m/s) for each of the shoe types was measured.

Results: Results showed that there is no significant difference in oxygen consumption (VO2) between the MBT and orthopedic shoes. Energy expenditure (kcal/min) was also calculated from the data and the results revealed that there is no significant differ-ence between MBT and orthopedic shoes in energy expenditure (kcal/min) either. The self selected velocity (m/s) between the two shoe types was also found to be insignificant.

Conclusion: The results showed no significant difference between the shoes. This could indicate that the specific construction of the MBT shoe has no effect on the energy expenditure (kcal/min) of its user. This lack of difference may be due to the equal mass of the shoes, but since oxygen consumption (VO2) was not investigated in orthopedic shoes with different shoe masses, this conclusion cannot be confirmed. The self selected velocity (m/s) was found to be insignificant and this finding could suggest to that prolonged usage of the MBT shoe may diminish gait parameters dissimilarities during ambulation. This study should therefore be seen as a pilot study and further investigation in this area should be pursued.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. , p. 33
Keywords [en]
Ambulation, Caloric expenditure, Oxygen uptake, Unstable shoe, Treadmill wal-king, Energy expenditure, Oxygen consumption, Self selected velocity, Masai Barefoot Tech-nology, Orthopedic shoes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13695OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-13695DiVA, id: diva2:360653
Uppsok
Medicine
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Available from: 2010-11-08 Created: 2010-11-04 Last updated: 2010-11-08Bibliographically approved

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