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Illness narratives of persons with post-polio syndrome.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
2000 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 354-361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This qualitative study investigated the lifetime illness experience of individuals with the 'late effects' of polio or post-polio syndrome. Fifteen individuals were interviewed twice about their illness experience and the interviews were transcribed verbatim. The empirical material first underwent a categorization process. The preliminary categories generated through this analysis were then condensed into broader categories which in the final analysis gave rise to the following temporal pattern or stages of the illness experience: (1) the acute phase of polio and subsequent treatment and care; (2) rehabilitation and care at institutions for the disabled; (3) adaptation to a new life; (4) living with the post-polio syndrome today, and finally, (5) memories of the past and apprehensions concerning the future. In spite of the difficult experiences of falling ill and slowly recovering from a life-threatening disease, these individuals have had a good life and accomplished most of their ambitions in the areas of work and family life. Their present psychosocial situation is complicated by the symptoms of the post-polio syndrome which make them more vulnerable to stress, but they are able to handle this burden except when any added strain makes it overwhelming. This potential vulnerability may sometimes express itself as a sudden flashback to traumatic polio experiences and it is therefore important that nurses are aware of the illness history of this patient group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 31, no 2, p. 354-361
Keywords [en]
Aged, Female, Humans, Interviews/methods, Life Change Events, Male, Middle Aged, Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome/*psychology, Sick Role, Time Factors
National Category
Nursing Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-3700PubMedID: 10672093OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-3700DiVA, id: diva2:34520
Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Ahlström, Gerd

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