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Association between change in body composition and change in inflammatory markers: An 11-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9042-4832
University College London.
University College London.
University College London.
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2010 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 95, no 12, 5370-5374 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation, but the long-term effects of weight change on inflammation are unknown.

Objective: The aim was to examine the association of change in weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference with change in C-reactive protein (CRP) and IL-6 and to assess whether this association is modified by baseline obesity status.

Design and Setting: The design was a prospective cohort study among civil servants (the Whitehall II Study, UK). We used data from two clinical screenings carried out in 1991–1993 and 2002–2004 (mean follow-up, 11.3 yr).

Participants: We studied 2496 men and 1026 women [mean age, 49.4 (SD = 6.0) yr at baseline] with measurements on inflammatory markers and anthropometry at both baseline and follow-up.

Main Outcome Measures: We measured change in serum CRP and IL-6 during follow-up.

Results: The mean increases in CRP and IL-6 were 0.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07–0.09] mg/liter and 0.04 (95% CI, 0.03–0.05) pg/ml per 1-kg increase in body weight during follow-up. Study members with a BMI less than 25 kg/m2 at baseline had an average increase in CRP of 0.06 (95% CI, 0.05–0.08) mg/liter per 1-kg increase in body weight, whereas the increase in those who were overweight (25 BMI < 30 kg/m2) and obese (BMI 30 kg/m2) was greater: 0.08 (95% CI, 0.06–0.09) mg/liter and 0.11 (95% CI, 0.07–0.14) mg/liter, respectively (P value for interaction = 0.002). Similar patterns were observed for changes in BMI and waist circumference.

Conclusions: Those who were overweight or obese at baseline had a greater absolute increase in CRP per unit increase in weight, BMI, and waist circumference than people who were normal weight.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 95, no 12, 5370-5374 p.
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-12818DOI: 10.1210/jc.2010-0730OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-12818DiVA: diva2:331948
Available from: 2010-07-28 Created: 2010-07-28 Last updated: 2016-06-30Bibliographically approved

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