Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Motivation in adult education: A problem solver or a euphemism for direction and control?
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
2006 (English)In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 25, no 4, 385-405 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adults' motivation to participate in continued education is of immediate interest, as lifelong learning is now considered as the solution to the pressing problems of increased levels of unemployment, not least among unskilled workers. Many theories concerning motivation and adult education maintain that individuals are innately motivated to learn, and conclude that motivation problems result from various dispositional, situational and structural impediments. If such barriers are removed, adults will be naturally motivated to educate themselves. This article argues against these theories and maintains that motivation should not be regarded as something residing within the individual. It is rather a construct of those who see it lacking in others. A critical reading of the literature shows how motivation theory stigmatizes people held ‘unmotivated’ in that the theories ascribe motivation problems to the individual, while assuming the basis upon which the problem is formulated for granted, and making those who formulate the problem invisible. Instead of a problem solver, motivation becomes a euphemism for direction and control. This article suggests that motivation should be seen as a relational concept, rather than as residing within the individual. Adults' motivation, or lack of this, is best understood in relation to those who formulate the problem. Instead of asking what motivates adults to study, research should focus on who states that this is a problem, and why, and the reasons for this conclusion. This approach makes the operations of power visible, and demonstrates how the discourse of lifelong learning, as a necessary political response to economic and technological determinism, constructs adults as inadequate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 25, no 4, 385-405 p.
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-2216DOI: 10.1080/02601370600772384Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33745604548OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-2216DiVA: diva2:33036
Available from: 2009-04-15 Created: 2009-03-09 Last updated: 2016-09-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Accepted Manuscript(167 kB)81 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 167 kBChecksum SHA-512
097d08989ee06d12e7e31ed4491f8d274c3ccdf9c6c2ad6d5f556e73c3d5c5d534048bd1509ee6b7a02d4f4b2b5ef658df4d9f2ce21e55325420f336badafe4b
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ahl, Helene
By organisation
HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell
In the same journal
International Journal of Lifelong Education
Pedagogy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 11371 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 1136 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf