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From Music Scenes to Music Clusters: The Economic Geography of Music in the U.S., 1970-2000
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4560-1905
2010 (English)In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 785-804Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Where do musicians locate, and why do creative industries such as music continue to cluster? This paper analyzes the economic geography of musicians and the recording industry in the US from 1970 to 2000, to shed light on the locational dynamics of music and creative industries more broadly. We examine the role of scale and scope economies in shaping the clustering and concentration of musicians and music industry firms. We argue that these two forces are bringing about a transformation in the geography of both musicians and music industry firms, evidenced in a shift away from regionally clustered, genre-specific music scenes, such as Memphis or Detroit, toward larger regional centers such as New York City and Los Angeles, which offer large markets for music employment and concentrations of other artistic and cultural endeavors that increase demand for musicians. We use population and income to probe for scale effects and look at concentrations of other creative and artistic industries to test for scope effects, while including a range of control variables in our analysis. We use lagged variables to determine whether certain places are consistently more successful at fostering concentrations of musicians and the music industry and to test for path dependency. We find some role for scale and scope effects and that both musicians and the music industry are concentrating in a relatively small number of large regional centers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 42, no 4, p. 785-804
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-10585OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-10585DiVA, id: diva2:248872
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Mellander, Charlotta

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