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The role of brain integrity in the association between occupational complexity and cognitive performance in subjects with increased risk of dementia
Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Clin Geriatr, Ctr Alzheimer Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Aging Res Ctr, Ctr Alzheimer Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Dept Neurol, Kuopio, Finland..ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3380-9530
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Center for Alzheimer Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Center for Alzheimer Research, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8617-0355
Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Aging Res Ctr, Ctr Alzheimer Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
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2023 (English)In: Gerontology, ISSN 0304-324X, E-ISSN 1423-0003, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 972-985Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
3. Good health and well-being, 8. Decent work and economic growth
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Mechanisms underlying the positive association between occupational mental demands and late-life cognition are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to assess whether the association between occupational complexity and cognition is related to and moderated by brain integrity in individuals at-risk for dementia. Brain integrity was appraised throughout structural measures (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI) and amyloid accumulation (Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB)-positron emission tomography, PiB-PET).

Methods: Participants from the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) neuroimaging sample -MRI (N=126), PiB-PET (N=41)- were included in a post-hoc cross-sectional analysis. Neuroimaging parameters comprised the Alzheimer ' s Disease signature cortical thickness (ADS, Freesurfer 5.3), medial temporal atrophy (MTA), and amyloid accumulation (PiB-PET). Cognition was assessed using the Neuropsychological Test Battery. Occupational complexity with data, people, and substantive complexity were classified through the Dictionary of Occupational Titles. Linear regression models included cognition as dependent variable, occupational complexity, measures of brain integrity, and their interaction terms as predictors.

Results: Occupational complexity with data and substantive complexity were associated with better cognition (overall cognition, executive function) when adjusting for ADS and MTA (independent association). Significant interaction effects between occupational complexity and brain integrity were also found, indicating that, for some indicators of brain integrity and cognition (e.g., overall cognition, processing speed), the positive association between occupational complexity and cognition occurred only among persons with higher brain integrity (moderated association).

Conclusion: Among individuals at-risk for dementia, occupational complexity does not seem to contribute towards resilience against neuropathology. These exploratory findings require validation in larger populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2023. Vol. 69, no 8, p. 972-985
Keywords [en]
Aging, Alzheimer’s disease, Amyloid, Cognition, Lifestyle, Mental stimulation, Neuropathology, Occupational complexity, Prevention
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-60483DOI: 10.1159/000530688ISI: 000973663400001PubMedID: 37071974Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85166475303Local ID: HOA;intsam;882422OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-60483DiVA, id: diva2:1759977
Funder
AlzheimerfondenEU, European Research Council, 804371Available from: 2023-05-29 Created: 2023-05-29 Last updated: 2023-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Kåreholt, Ingemar

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