Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Does Size Matter? Scaling of CO2 Emissions and U.S. Urban Areas
Department of Economics, Boise State University, Boise, ID, United States.
School of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States.
Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4101-4279
Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States.
2013 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6, article id e64727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

Urban areas consume more than 66% of the world's energy and generate more than 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions. With the world's population expected to reach 10 billion by 2100, nearly 90% of whom will live in urban areas, a critical question for planetary sustainability is how the size of cities affects energy use and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Are larger cities more energy and emissions efficient than smaller ones? Do larger cities exhibit gains from economies of scale with regard to emissions? Here we examine the relationship between city size and CO2 emissions for U.S. metropolitan areas using a production accounting allocation of emissions. We find that for the time period of 1999-2008, CO2 emissions scale proportionally with urban population size. Contrary to theoretical expectations, larger cities are not more emissions efficient than smaller ones. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PLOS , 2013. Vol. 8, no 6, article id e64727
Keywords [en]
carbon dioxide, fossil fuel, article, carbon footprint, demography, energy consumption, population density, population size, United States, urban area, Atmosphere, Cities, Greenhouse Effect
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-58272DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0064727Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84878623071OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-58272DiVA, id: diva2:1689256
Available from: 2022-08-22 Created: 2022-08-22 Last updated: 2023-02-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Strumsky, Deborah

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Strumsky, Deborah
In the same journal
PLOS ONE
Economics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 15 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf