Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Bryophyte cover and richness decline after 18 years of experimental warming in Alpine Sweden
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5322-9827
College of Ecology and Environment, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu, China.
Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, Chinese Academy of Science, Chengdu, China.
Show others and affiliations
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

1. Bryophytes in the Arctic and Alpine regions are important in terms of biodiversity, cover and biomass. However, climate change and widespread shrubification of alpine and arctic tundra is predicted to increase in the future, with potentially large impacts on bryophyte communities.

2. We studies the impact of 18 years of experimental warming with open top chambers (OTCs) on bryophyte cover, richness and diversity in an alpine mesic meadow and a heath plant community in Northern Sweden. In addition we investigated the relationship between deciduous shrubs and bryophytes.

3. Cover and richness of bryophytes both declined due to long-term warming, while diversity did not show any significant responses. After 18 years, bryophyte cover had decreased by 71% and 26 in the heath and meadow, while richness declined by 39% and 26%, respectively.

4. Synthesis. Decline in total bryophyte cover in both communities in response to long-term warming was driven by a general decline in many species, with only two individual species showing significant declines. Although most of the species included in the individual analyses did not show any detectable changes, the cumulative change in all species was significant. In addition, species loss was slower than the general decline in bryophyte abundance. As hypothesized, we found significant negative relationship between deciduous shrub cover and bryophyte cover, but not bryophyte richness, in both plant communities. This is likely due to a more delayed decline in species richness compared to abundance, similar to what was observed in response to long-term warming.

Keywords [en]
Arctic, climate change, global warming, mosses, plant-climate interactions, plant-plant interactions, species richness, tundra
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46790DOI: 10.32942/osf.io/zrbqfOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-46790DiVA, id: diva2:1368670
Note

Published 2019, November 7.

Available from: 2019-11-08 Created: 2019-11-08 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Jägerbrand, Annika K.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jägerbrand, Annika K.
By organisation
JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 69 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf