Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Ethical considerations in nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics
Centre for Theology and Religious Studies, Ethics Division, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9441-1681
Theologische Fakultät, Universität Luzern, Luzern, Switzerland.
2020 (English)In: Principles of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics: Fundamentals of individualized nutrition / [ed] R. De Caterina, J. A. Martinez, & M. Kohlmeier, London: Elsevier, 2020, p. 543-548Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Ethics is the study of the normative dimensions of human relations and experiences. This chapter discusses such questions in relation to basic values in modern society. The normative foundations for the analysis are the values of human dignity, autonomy, freedom, equality, and solidarity, as well as the responsibilities of society toward its citizens, including freedom, security, and justice. The questions that are brought up touch on how implementing nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics in personalized nutrition services relates to these values.

Health and food are primary human needs. The choice of food can contribute to the support of health, but it can also come into conflict with health. Personalized nutrition may be seen as part of a wider trend toward early preventive actions to treat susceptibility to disease. If personalization of nutrition can contribute to eating habits that support health instead of threatening it, this will be beneficial for the individual, but it may also be good for society as a whole. As a consequence, pressure on societal expenses for health care may be reduced.

Personalized nutrition, as well as the wider concept of precision nutrition, have stimulated expectations and are often described as having great potential, but it has also been difficult to realize them. Studies indicate that there is widespread optimism among researchers engaged in nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics regarding at least its long-term benefits, whereas there are divergent viewpoints within the wider research community. In this situation, ethical concerns need to receive attention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Elsevier, 2020. p. 543-548
Keywords [en]
Direct-to-consumer services; Human dignity; Personalized nutrition; Precision nutrition
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46567DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-804572-5.00072-0ISBN: 978-0-12-804572-5 (print)ISBN: 978-0-12-804587-9 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-46567DiVA, id: diva2:1361162
Available from: 2019-10-15 Created: 2019-10-15 Last updated: 2019-12-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Ahlgren, Jennie

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ahlgren, Jennie
By organisation
Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL)
Ethics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 155 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf