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Child Headed Household Experiences: A retrospective qualitative study on parental HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe and their children’s participation in everyday life
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. (CHILD)
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

A chronic or long- term illness challenges conventional family dynamics and can incite concerning familial role reversal, especially upon parental diagnosis. This has been deemed one of the bedrocks of Child Headed Households’ (CHH). The CHH phenomenon is prominent in Sub-Saharan countries such as South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi. It is argued as one of the results of acute poverty conditions or undermanaged health and welfare epidemics akin to HIV/AIDS. This study had the aim to explore the participatory and support experiences of Zimbabwean young adults who due to parental HIV/AIDS began to head their households and or were orphaned during their childhood years. It sought to fill in the gap in literature surrounding the participatory and support experiences of this sample group type. A retrospective qualitative methodology through use of open- ended interviews was conducted. Results showed that the experiences of each child were firstly dependant on the household structure and orphan-hood status. Most of the participants had participation impactful transitionary experiences either within their constructs of their family and homes or, into a new setting. Most CHH faced challenges in attendance in school or play with friends due to basic need provision limitation. The social services in Zimbabwe were commendable in their support towards the participants who needed to be moved from their dire familial homes during early childhood. The Zimbabwean Kubatana culture, which is appraised for its tight knit family units and support was challenged. In terms of achievement of their two- dimensional participation in life, biological or foster parental care and inclusion in a family unit was a suggested solution to children’s full and continual development. This was evident through a recurred expression of the need for parental love and connection in their childhood years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 45
Keywords [en]
Child Headed Household, Orphan-hood, Parental HIV, Participation, Support
National Category
Social Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46395ISRN: JU-HLK-SBU-2-20190071OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-46395DiVA, id: diva2:1355535
Subject / course
HLK, Child Studies
Presentation
2019-06-03, HC334, Jönköping University Gjuterigatan 5, Jönköping, 09:00 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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