Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Psychosocial working conditions across working life may predict late-life physical function: a follow-up cohort study
Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA.
Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8617-0355
2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Increasing life expectancy has made understanding the mechanisms underlying late-life health and function more important. We set out to investigate whether trajectories of change in psychosocial working conditions are associated with late-life physical function.

METHODS: Two Swedish surveys, linked at the individual level, were used (n = 803). A psychosocial job exposure matrix was used to measure psychosocial working conditions during people's first occupation, as well as their occupation every five years thereafter until baseline in 1991. Physical function was measured in 2014. Random effects growth curve models were used to calculate intraindividual trajectories of working conditions. Predictors of physical function were assessed with ordered logistic regression.

RESULTS: A more active job at baseline was associated with increased odds of late-life physical function (OR 1.15, CI 1.01-1.32). Higher baseline job strain was associated with decreased odds of late-life physical function (OR 0.75, CI 0.59-0.96). A high initial level followed by an upward trajectory of job strain throughout working life was associated with decreased odds of late-life physical function (OR 0.32, CI 0.17-0.58).

CONCLUSIONS: Promoting a healthier workplace by reducing chronic stress and inducing intellectual stimulation, control, and personal growth may contribute to better late-life physical function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019. Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1125
Keywords [en]
Cohort, Job control, Life course, Mobility limitations, Sweden, Work-related stress
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Work Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46361DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-7473-yISI: 000481797300003PubMedID: 31419956Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85070911774Local ID: GOA HHJ 2019;HHJARNISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-46361DiVA, id: diva2:1354653
Available from: 2019-09-25 Created: 2019-09-25 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Kåreholt, Ingemar

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kåreholt, Ingemar
By organisation
HHJ, Institute of GerontologyHHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping)
In the same journal
BMC Public Health
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health SciencesWork Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 19 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf