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Business disruptions and affective reactions: A strategy-as-practice perspective on fast strategic decision making
Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0894-8678
Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Economics, Karlskrona, Sweden.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2748-8830
2019 (English)In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study examines management teams' work in making fast strategic decisions under extreme time pressure. Focusing on affective reactions as behavioural responses to business disruptions due to unforeseen events, we elaborate the strategy-as-practice perspective by drawing upon qualitative and quantitative datasets collected from 39 sites in a corporate setting over three consecutive phases during a four-year period. The data show two types of patterns: intensity-focused and type-focused affective reactions in management teams' use of management tools as part of mental shortcuts when making fast decisions. These patterns are contingent on whether the teams functioned in contexts that had previous experience of management of similar unforeseen events. Affective reactions in the use of tool-based mental shortcuts unveil a mechanism of practices that explains middle management teams’ strategic actions during business disruption due to unforeseen events. While research predominantly suggests that affect is “bad” for management teams in crisis-related contexts, we find that this view is misleading. Affective reactions not only hinder but also aid crucial information exchanges between middle management teams and corporate levels while making strategic decisions under extreme time pressure. Therefore, we propose a reconceptualized view of managing fast strategic decision making and discuss the implications for theory and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45849DOI: 10.1016/j.lrp.2019.101910Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85071420408OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-45849DiVA, id: diva2:1349329
Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-09-18

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The full text will be freely available from 2022-08-17 00:00
Available from 2022-08-17 00:00

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Netz, JoakimBrundin, Ethel

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  • apa
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