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Pain associated with the chronic pelvic pain syndrome is strongly related to the ambient temperature
Department of Research and Development, Skaraborgs Sjukhus, Skövde, Sweden.
Department of Research and Development, Skaraborgs Sjukhus, Skövde, Sweden.
Department of Research and Development, Skaraborgs Sjukhus, Skövde, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6549-086x
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 279-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. There are indications suggesting that the pain associated with the chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) may be related to cold. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how the symptom intensity reported by the patient relates to the time of the year in a temperate climate, i.e. to the ambient temperature and to weather changes.

Material and methods. Thirty-one patients, mean age 51 years (range 35-66 years), with CPPS for 17 +/- 10 years (3-42 years) were asked to complete a set of questionnaires including questions concerning how they experienced their symptom intensity during the different seasons using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) questionnaire.

Results. The total NIH-CPSI score was 22.2 +/- 8.2. There was a highly marked relationship between season and pain intensity as reported by the informants: it was experienced to be three times more intense during the winter months. All subjects reported that a temperature drop was associated with deterioration.

Conclusion. The strong relationship between the ambient temperature, a drop in temperature and the pain experienced by men with CPPS confirms the association between cold and symptom intensity in the Scandinavian countries, where the seasonal temperature variation spans a long range and the winters are long. The cause of this relationship is still to be established. Muscular spasm/stiffness is a possibility that remains to be explored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2012. Vol. 46, no 4, p. 279-283
Keywords [en]
chronic pelvic pain, cold weather, men
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45752DOI: 10.3109/00365599.2012.669404ISI: 000306479900006PubMedID: 22452545Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84862198171OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-45752DiVA, id: diva2:1346871
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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