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Linking knowledge and attitudes: Determining neurotypical knowledge about and attitudes towards autism
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket Brisbane, QLD, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0756-6862
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 7, article id e0220197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

"Why are neurotypicals so pig-ignorant about autism?" an autistic person wrote on the Curtin Autism Research Group's on-line portal as a response to a call for research questions. Coproduced with an autistic researcher, knowledge about and attitudes towards autism were analysed from 1,054 completed surveys, representing the Australian neurotypical adult population. The majority, 81.5% of participants had a high level of knowledge and 81.3% of participants had a strong positive attitude towards autism. Neither age, nor education level had an impact on attitudes. However, attitudes were influenced by knowledge about 'Societal Views and Ideas'; 'What it Could be Like to Have Autism'; and the demographic variables 'Knowing and having spent time around someone with autism'; and gender (women having more positive attitudes than men). Thus, targeted interventions, geared more towards men than women, to increase knowledge about autism could further improve attitudes and increase acceptance of the autistic community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science , 2019. Vol. 14, no 7, article id e0220197
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Neurology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45536DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0220197PubMedID: 31344074Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85069963650Local ID: GOA HHJ 2019, GOA HLK 2019;HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-45536DiVA, id: diva2:1342091
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved

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Falkmer, TorbjörnFalkmer, Marita

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