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Atypical visual processing but comparable levels of emotion recognition in adults with autism during the processing of social scenes
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia . (CHILD)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7275-3472
School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia; Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research; Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet & Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden .
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2019 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Understanding the underlying visual scanning patterns of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during the processing of complex emotional scenes remains limited. This study compared the complex emotion recognition performance of adults with ASD (n = 23) and matched neurotypical participants (n = 25) using the Reading the Mind in Films Task. Behaviourally, both groups exhibited similar emotion recognition accuracy. Visual fixation time towards key social regions of each stimuli was examined via eye tracking. Individuals with ASD demonstrated significantly longer fixation time towards the non-social areas. No group differences were evident for the facial and body regions of all characters in the social scenes. The findings provide evidence of the heterogeneity associated with complex emotion processing in individuals with ASD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Autism, Dynamic stimuli, Eye tracking, Naturalistic, Social cognition
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Other Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-44341DOI: 10.1007/s10803-019-04104-yScopus ID: 2-s2.0-85068044894Local ID: ;HLKCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-44341DiVA, id: diva2:1324126
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-07-14

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