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Is an oral health coaching programme a way to sustain oral health for elderly people in nursing homes: A feasibility study
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2148-5225
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0877-4759
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2786-707x
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

This study examines the feasibility of an oral health coaching programme involving practical support on individual level to staff in a nursing home in Sweden, aiming to improve oral health care‐related beliefs of nursing staff and the oral health of residents.

Methods

This intervention study consisted of three wards from one nursing home, and both staff (n = 48) and residents (n = 58) were invited. In the control ward, 9 staff and 16 residents participated; in test ward 1, 10 staff and 13 residents participated; and at test ward 2, 14 staff and 17 residents participated. An oral health coaching programme was performed 4 h/wk for 3 months. The staff completed the nursing Dental Coping Beliefs Scale at baseline and after 9 months. Oral health of the residents was assessed using the Revised Oral Assessment Guide and mucosal‐plaque score at baseline and after 3, 6 and 9 months.

Results

At baseline, 33 staff participated and 22 at 9 months follow‐up. For the residents, the figures were 48 and 32, respectively. After the intervention, the nursing DCBS revealed changes related to usage of fluoride, oral health support, gum disease and approximal cleaning. The most frequently reported oral health problems among the residents pertained to teeth and gums. The residents’ relatively high level of oral health was stable during the study period.

Conclusions

Despite limitations in the programme, an oral health coaching programme can support nursing staff in maintaining a high level of oral health in residents. The programme was shown feasible, although design improvements are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020. p. 107-115
Keywords [en]
intervention, mucosal‐plaque index, nursing Dental Coping Beliefs Scale, nursing staff, older people, oral hygiene, Revised Oral Assessment Guide
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43630DOI: 10.1111/idh.12421ISI: 000495840800001PubMedID: 31618518Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85074994937OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-43630DiVA, id: diva2:1314800
Note

Part of licentiate thesis in its manuscript form.

Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2020-01-14
In thesis
1. Dental- and nursing care collaborations in Sweden – A way to support nursing staff in oral hygiene care for older people
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dental- and nursing care collaborations in Sweden – A way to support nursing staff in oral hygiene care for older people
2019 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Oral health is an integral part of the general health and quality of life. Yet oral health among older people requiring nursing care is often poor. Despite this group’s frequent contact with health care services, they tend to lose contact with dental care. In nursing care, nursing staff are tasked to assist with oral hygiene care, but this has become more demanding as many older people retain more teeth or have advanced prosthetic constructions. Previous research in the field emphasised the need of collaboration between dental- and nursing care to support the nursing staff in this task. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding the effects of these collaborations.

Aim: The overall aim of the thesis is to examine two oral health programmes used within nursing care with different design regarding support from and collaboration with dental care.

Methods: Quantitative research methods was used. The data in Study I comes from an oral health assessments guide (ROAG-J) performed by nursing staff in a national health register. Oral health, assessed at two occasions from older people with nursing care, were used. Study II was a controlled intervention study performed at a nursing home. The intervention involved individual coaching of nursing staff in oral hygiene care by dental hygienist for four hours per week at the ward for a period of three months. Oral assessments of older people were performed by dental hygienists and questionnaires to nursing home staff were used.

Result: In Study I, 667 individuals aged 65 years or older, receiving nursing care services and assessed using ROAG-J between November 2011 and March 2014 were included. No statistically significant difference in any of the oral health variables was found between the first and subsequent assessments. At the first assessments, less than one third of participants had oral health problems. At the first assessment, status of the tongue differed in men and women (p < .01); at the subsequent assessment, gender differences were found in voice (p < .05), mucous membranes (p < .003), tongue (p < .01), and saliva (p < .006).

In Study II, 33 nursing staff and 48 residents participated at the baseline measurement and 22 and 32 respectively at the 9-month follow-up. The nursing staff changed in knowledge and attitudes related to gum disease, approximal cleaning, usage of fluoride and the likelihood that older persons would express the need for oral health support. The most frequently reported oral health problems among the residents pertained to teeth and gums. The residents relatively high level of oral health was stable during the study period.

Conclusions: The participants in the oral health programmes were able to maintain an acceptable level of oral health during the study periods although health was likely to decline. The nursing staff maintained a high level of knowledge and attitudes about oral health. However, there seems to be a discrepancy regarding the prevalence of oral health problems among older people. A collaboration between dental- and nursing care providers indicates a positive influence on providing oral hygiene care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, 2019. p. 62
Series
Hälsohögskolans avhandlingsserie, ISSN 1654-3602 ; 099
Keywords
oral health, older people, oral hygiene, nursing care, nursing staff, interprofessional collaboration
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43631 (URN)978-91-85835-98-0 (ISBN)
Presentation
2019-06-11, Forum Humanum, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, IsabelleTorgé, Cristina JoyLindmark, Ulrika

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