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Parental support in promoting children's health behaviours and preventing overweight and obesity - a long-term follow-up of the cluster-randomised healthy school start study II trial.
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics. Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2733-4441
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Effects of obesity prevention interventions in early childhood are only meaningful if they are sustained over time, but long-term follow-up studies are rare. The school-based cluster-randomised Healthy School Start (HSS) trial aimed at child health promotion and obesity prevention through parental support was carried out in 31 pre-school classes (378 families) in disadvantaged areas in Sweden during 2012-2013. Post-intervention results showed intervention effects on intake of unhealthy foods and drinks, and lower BMI-sds in children with obesity at baseline. This study aimed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness 4 years post-intervention.

METHODS: Data were collected from 215 children in March-June 2017. Child dietary intake, screen time, and physical activity were measured through parental-proxy questionnaires. Child height and weight were measured by the research group. Group effects were examined using Poisson, linear, logistic, and quantile regression for data on different levels. Analyses were done by intention to treat, per protocol, and sensitivity analyses using multiple imputation.

RESULTS: No between-group effects on dietary intake, screen time, physical activity, or BMI-sds were found for the entire group at the four-year follow-up. In girls, a significant subgroup-effect was found favouring intervention compared to controls with a lower intake of unhealthy foods, but this was not sustained in the sensitivity analysis. In boys, a significant sub-group effect was found where the boys in the intervention group beyond the 95th percentile had significantly higher BMI-sds compared to boys in the control group. This effect was sustained in the sensitivity analysis. Analyses per protocol showed significant intervention effects regarding a lower intake of unhealthy foods and drinks in the children with a high intervention dose compared to controls.

CONCLUSIONS: Four years after the intervention, only sub-group effects were found, and it is unlikely that the HSS intervention had clinically meaningful effects on the children. These results suggest that school-based prevention programmes need to be extended for greater long-term effectiveness by e.g. integration into school routine practice. In addition, results showed that children with a high intervention dose had better long-term outcomes compared to controls, which emphasises the need for further work to increase family engagement in interventions.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN, ISRCTN39690370, retrospectively registered March 1, 2013, http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN39690370 .

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019. Vol. 19, no 1, article id 104
Keywords [en]
BMI-sds, Diet, Intervention, Motivational interviewing, Physical activity, Quantile regression, School, Screen time, Sedentary behaviour, Socio-economic position
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43573DOI: 10.1186/s12887-019-1467-xISI: 000464863900001PubMedID: 30975106Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85064209327Local ID: GOA JIBS 2019OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-43573DiVA, id: diva2:1314022
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved

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