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Communication about patients during ward rounds and verbal handovers: A gender perspective
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2045-7716
2019 (English)In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This article investigates gender patterns on how two interprofessional teams communicate about patients in their absence. Thirteen ward rounds and 17 verbal handovers were audio-recorded and analyzed through a qualitative content analysis. The ward rounds consisted of 1 physician and 2–4 nurses. The verbal handovers consisted of 2–3 nurses and as many assistant nurses. The data were collected at a cardiac clinic at a hospital in southern Sweden. The results indicate that when patients acted according to socially-accepted gender norms, the communication among the interprofessional teams was characterized as ‘professional’, including communication primarily about the medical situation of the patient and statements of a non-judgmental nature. When patients did not act according to socially-accepted gender norms, the communication among the interprofessional teams switched to become more ‘informal’, including non-medical oriented statements of a negative nature. When the healthcare workers take the patient’s psycho-social condition into account, as advocated by concepts like ‘holistic care’ and ‘patient-centered care’, the risk for speculation and arbitrariness may increase, especially within interprofessional teams who hold a nursing responsibility for patients. Establishing more defined guidelines of how non-medical aspects should be dealt with are thus of importance to the development of an equitable provision and delivery of healthcare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Content analysis, counter-stereotypical actors, gender, holistic care, patient-centered care, stereotype actors
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Medical Ethics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43531DOI: 10.1080/13561820.2019.1593116PubMedID: 30912686Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85063457827Local ID: HOA HLK 20XXOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-43531DiVA, id: diva2:1306702
Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2019-04-24

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Hedegaard, Joel

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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