Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
So, what you’re saying is …?: A study of year 9 students’ attitudes towards and perceived knowledge of communicative competence
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesisAlternative title
Så det du säger är ...? : En studie om elevers inställning till kommunikativ kompetens och upplevda kommunikativa förmåga i årskurs 9 (Swedish)
Abstract [en]

Swedes’ proficiency in English is often high up in the world rankings among the countries in which English is an L2[1]. Learners of English are routinely tested in the Swedish school system, using standardized national tests to measure how well students are doing nationwide, whilst also providing teachers with sometimes essential assistance in grading students’ language skills. At the end of year 9, students should have developed “all-round communicative skills”. But how do we determine what having “all-round communicative skills” constitutes? What are learners’ attitudes towards and perception of what they learn, how they learn it and their own present ability? What are some areas in which they believe they can improve the most, and is there a preferred way to learn a specific skill? Is communicative competence even focused on in the classroom, and if it is – how and how often? The purpose of this study is threefold: to identify how communicatively competent students in year 9 consider themselves in comparison to their peers; how much they believe that they work with communicative competence in school; and what they perceive to be their weakness and area of communicative competence that could be improved most. Secondarily, are there any differences in what is believed to be focused on in class between students and teachers? To answer these questions, an overview of the aspects that together constitutes being communicatively competent based on relevant previous research will be provided. The aims of English as a school subject in Swedish schools are studied in order to see what the goals are, according to the curriculum. After collecting data using interviews and a questionnaire, results indicate that students are not always aware of when and how classroom activities are designed to improve communicative competence. Students in general also seemingly have a varying opinion on what areas they have the most potential for improvement in. There is thus a disparity between learners’ expectations and perception of their own needs, and teachers’ opinions of what requires improvement and how learning of communicative skills is best done.

[1] In the writing process, a decision was made to call English an L2 and not a FL throughout the study, since they are still trying to learn another language than their L1 in either case (Yule, 2014, p. 187).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 37
Keywords [en]
communicative competence, second language learning, pragmatic awareness, teaching focus, learner perception, lower secondary school language teaching
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43183ISRN: JU-HLK-ENA-1-20190003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-43183DiVA, id: diva2:1290853
Subject / course
HLK, English
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-02-25 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

So, what you're saying is ...?(469 kB)35 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 469 kBChecksum SHA-512
ad39a21c0a31452889cf58520669539ae9389e92304457c2fc918436618e450a01a0d15ac1b8cbb50231cd33915079905ad18a006f92a6aa477707b01a901970
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
School of Education and Communication
General Language Studies and Linguistics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 35 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 108 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf