Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Longitudinal twin study of subjective health: Differences in genetic and environmental components of variance across age and sex
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2346-2470
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, USA.
Department of Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, USA.
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The current analysis examines sex differences in longitudinal changes in genetic and environmental influences on three measures of subjective health.

Method: Sample includes 7372 twins (mean intake age = 73.22) with up to 8 waves of measurement (mean = 3.1). Three subjective health (SH) items were included: general self-rated health (SRH), health compared to age peers (COMP), and impact of health on activities (ACT) which previous research shows capture different frames of reference.

Results: Latent growth curve modeling indicated significant differences across gender and frame of reference in trajectories of change with age and in genetic and environmental contributions to change. Men have higher mean scores on all three SH measures, indicating better SH, but there were no sex differences in pattern of change with age. Accelerating declines with age were found for SRH and ACT, whereas COMP improved with age. Results indicated more genetic variance for women than men, but declining genetic variance for both after age 70. Increasing shared environmental variance with increasing age was also found for both sexes.

Discussion: As aging triggers a re-evaluation of the meaning of "good health," physical aspects of health may become less important and shared cultural conceptions of health may become more relevant. This change in conceptions of good health may reflect both aging and the change in composition of the elderly population as a result of selective survival.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2020. Vol. 75, no 1, p. 1-10
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43119DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gby030PubMedID: 29590493Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85076441728Local ID: KOA HHJ 2020;HHJARNISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-43119DiVA, id: diva2:1290487
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Finkel, Deborah

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Finkel, Deborah
By organisation
HHJ, Institute of GerontologyHHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping)
In the same journal
The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 82 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf