Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Children’s influence on wellbeing and acculturative stress in refugee families
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Department of Teacher Education, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6357-6491
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no Suppl. 1, p. 1-9, article id 1564517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This paper examines intergenerational, interdependent and contextual aspects of wellbeing and acculturative stress in refugee families during resettlement. Particular focus is placed on how children influence their parents.

Method: The study is based on interviews with and diary notes from Middle Eastern parents and children residing in Sweden.

Results: Analyzes of the narratives show how the direct and indirect influence of the child affects the parents in both negative and positive ways. Acculturative stress follows from unexpected and undesired migration outcomes, such as parent-child conflicts and low school achievement. Such strains add to other hardships refugee families face, for instance, unemployment, welfare dependence, poor housing, and insufficient mastery of the majority language. However, acculturative stress can be alleviated by the children's educational success, and reciprocal practices of love and caring including helping out with chores and supporting each other in different ways.

Conclusions: Children's agency has significant effects on parents' wellbeing, as wellbeing is accomplished in and through relationships with others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018. Vol. 13, no Suppl. 1, p. 1-9, article id 1564517
Keywords [en]
Refugee families, immigrant parenthood, children’s agency, wellbeing, acculturative stress
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42791DOI: 10.1080/17482631.2018.1564517ISI: 000459729600011PubMedID: 30696382Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85060827754OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-42791DiVA, id: diva2:1284216
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00581Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Bergnéhr, Disa

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bergnéhr, Disa
By organisation
HHJ, Dep. of Social WorkHHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue)
In the same journal
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being
Social Work

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 31 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf