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A description of a contemporary human skull material in respect of age, gender, temporomandibular joint changes, and some dental variables
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
2008 (English)In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 32, no 2, 69-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Controversy exists concerning the etiological factors behind degenerative changes in the temporomandibularjoints (TMJs). Occlusal factors, ageing, gender and genetics are some factors that have been discussed.The aim of the present study was to examine a contemporary human skull material in respect of gender, age, occlusal variables and form and surface changes in the temporomandibular joints.The material consisted of 259 human skulls, 170 males and 89 females, with an age range of 18-100 years.The over all dental status was poor, and 22% were edentulous. Both medio-lateral and antero-posterior dimensions as well as anterior and superior shape of the condyles were in good agreement with previous results. Form and surface changes of both the condyles and the temporal components were, however, more common in the present material compared to most previous studies. Men had on average more degenerative changes in the TMJs compared to women. In agreement with many previous studies, there was an increase of such changes with increasing age. Severe tooth attrition was a common finding, especially in men, but no correlation was found between this variable and the severity of degenerative changes in the TMJs. Abfractions were found in only 3 cases. Considering the common finding of severe tooth attrition,the rare occurrence of abfractions does not lend support to the hypothesis that abfractions are mainly caused by occlusal loading. In conclusion: Condylar dimensions and shape of the condyles were in good agreement with previously presented results. Severe tooth attrition and pronounced degenerative changes in the TMJs were common findings but no statistically significant association was found between these two variables.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 32, no 2, 69-81 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-7166PubMedID: 18700335OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-7166DiVA: diva2:128027
Available from: 2008-12-13 Created: 2008-12-11 Last updated: 2009-03-16Bibliographically approved

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Magnusson, Tomas

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