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Effects of snuff on the oral health status of adolescent males: a comparative study.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
2005 (English)In: Oral health & preventive dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of snuff on the oral health status of adolescent males. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants consisted of 80 adolescent males between 16-25 years, 40 snuff users and 40 non-users. The snuff users and non-users were matched with reference to their age. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing questions on general and oral health, daily oral hygiene and tobacco habits. The clinical examination was carried out in a dental office by two experienced dental hygienists. Snuff lesions were clinically classified on a four-point scale and documented on colour slides. The examination also assessed the number of teeth, restored tooth surfaces, plaque index and gingival index, probing pocket depth and gingival recessions. RESULTS: Out of 40 snuff users, 35 showed snuff incluced lesions. The clinical diagnosis of snuff users' mucosa showed snuff lesions of different severity clinically classified as degree 1, 2 and 3. When explaining snuff lesions of degree 2 and 3, hours of daily snuff use and package form (portion-bag snuff versus loose snuff) was statistically significant. There were no statistical differences between snuff users and non-users regarding restored tooth surfaces, presence of plaque, gingival inflammation and probing pocket depth. Seventeen percent of the cases showed loss of periodontal attachment as gingival recessions. CONCLUSION: In spite of mucosal lesions caused by snuff there were no statistical differences in prevalence in plaque and gingivitis between snuff users and non-users. However, some cases showed loss of periodontal attachment as gingival recessions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 3, no 2, p. 77-85
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-6996PubMedID: 16173384OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-6996DiVA, id: diva2:127874
Available from: 2008-12-10 Created: 2008-12-10 Last updated: 2009-03-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
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  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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