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Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8196-1289
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1884-5696
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 717-728Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The knowledge about the association between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) demands at work and self-rated health (SRH) is insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the association between repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and risk of suboptimal SRH, and to determine modifications by sex or socioeconomic position (SEP).

Methods

A prospective design was used, including repeated measurement of ICT demands at work, measured 2 years apart. SRH was measured at baseline and at follow-up after 4 years. The data were derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), including 4468 gainfully employees (1941 men, 2527 women) with good SRH at baseline.

Results

In the total study sample, repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up (OR 1.34 [CI 1.06–1.70]), adjusted for age, sex, SEP, health behaviours, BMI, job strain and social support. An interaction between ICT demands and sex was observed (p = 0.010). The risk was only present in men (OR 1.53 [CI 1.09–2.16]), and not in women (OR 1.17 [CI 0.85–1.62]). The risk of suboptimal SRH after consistently high ICT demands at work was most elevated in participants with high SEP (OR 1.68 [CI 1.02–2.79]), adjusted for age, sex, health behaviours, BMI and job strain. However, no significant interaction between ICT demands and SEP regarding SRH was observed.

Conclusion

Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up, and the association was modified by sex.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 92, no 5, p. 717-728
Keywords [en]
ICT demands at work; Occupational health; Work-related stress; Self-rated health; Gender differences; Socioeconomic position
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42592DOI: 10.1007/s00420-019-01407-6ISI: 000473828600010PubMedID: 30684000Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85060727375Local ID: HOA HHJ 2019OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-42592DiVA, id: diva2:1277815
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-1141Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved

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Stadin, MagdalenaBroström, AndersFransson, Eleonor I.

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