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Sleep disturbances and dementia risk: A multicenter study
Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: ingemar.kareholt@ki.se
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Center for Health and Ageing AGECAP, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Center for Health and Ageing AGECAP, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 14, no 10, p. 1235-1242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Few longitudinal studies assessed whether sleep disturbances are associated with dementia risk.

METHODS: Sleep disturbances were assessed in three population-based studies (H70 study and Kungsholmen Project [Sweden]; Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia study [Finland]). Late-life baseline analyses (3-10 years follow-up) used all three studies (N = 1446). Baseline ages ≈ 70 years (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia, H70), and ≈84 years (Kungsholmen Project). Midlife baseline (age ≈ 50 years) analyses used Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (21 and 32 years follow-up) (N = 1407).

RESULTS: Midlife insomnia (fully adjusted hazard ratio = 1.24, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.50) and late-life terminal insomnia (fully adjusted odds ratio = 1.94, 95% confidence interval = 1.08-3.49) were associated with a higher dementia risk. Late-life long sleep duration (>9 hours) was also associated with an increased dementia risk (adjusted odds ratio = 3.98, 95% confidence interval = 1.87-8.48).

DISCUSSION: Midlife insomnia and late-life terminal insomnia or long sleep duration were associated with a higher late-life dementia risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 14, no 10, p. 1235-1242
Keywords [en]
Dementia, Insomnia, Sleep disturbances, Sleep duration
National Category
Neurology Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41999DOI: 10.1016/j.jalz.2018.05.012ISI: 000446086000001PubMedID: 30030112Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85054425288Local ID: HHJARNISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-41999DiVA, id: diva2:1262204
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-11-09Bibliographically approved

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