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Incentives, impacts and behavioural issues in the context of payment for ecosystem services programmes: Lessons for REDD+
Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, United States.
Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, United States.
Center for Tropical Agricultural Research and Education Costa Rica, Turrialba, Costa Rica.
2013 (English)In: Globalization and development: Rethinking interventions and governance / [ed] Arne Bigsten, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 147-167Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The last decade has witnessed a rapid increase in the popularity – both in theory and practice – of payments for ecosystem services (PES) as an environmental policy tool in developing countries (Pattanayak et al. 2010; Ferraro 2011). An early review by Landell-Mills and Porras (2002) found approximately 200 incipient PES schemes in developing countries, and the numbers have only increased since then (Pattanayak et al. 2010). Although often small in scale, a few countries have established nationwide PES schemes: Costa Rica has its Pagos por Servicios Ambientales (PSA) programme, which, since its inception in 1997, has made payments for forest conservation (primarily) on nearly half a million hectares of land; China has its Sloping Lands Conservation Programme (SLCP), which has thus far contracted 12 million hectares for reforestation in an attempt to stem soil erosion; and Mexico has its Pago de Servicios Ambientales Hidrológicos (PSAH) programme, which compensates beneficiary communities for preserving 600,000 hectares of forest (Pattanayak et al. 2010).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2013. p. 147-167
Series
Routledge studies in development economics ; 102
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41579DOI: 10.4324/9780203088678Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84906032576ISBN: 9780203088678 (electronic)ISBN: 9780415635684 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-41579DiVA, id: diva2:1250957
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved

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Nordén, Anna

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CiteExportLink to record
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