Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
AR(e) you for real?: A quantitative case study examining a Augmented Reality application’s effect on the user’s purchase intention.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, has called “virtual and augmented reality the next major computing platform capable of replacing smartphones and traditional PCs” (Heath, 2017, n.p). Furthermore one of the leading investment banks, Goldman Sachs, predicted the market for augmented and virtual reality to be worth 80 billion dollars by the year 2025. If this estimation turns out to be accurate, the AR and VR market would be one of the fastest growing markets within digital products (Goldman Sachs, 2016). As the AR technology develops, the options for marketer’s increases and makes it possible to reach out, as well as interact with consumers in new, and innovative ways. Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine if a product experience through an augmented reality application can be equated to a product experience in real life. Method The research question; Can a product experience through an augmented reality application be equated to a product experience in real life, when shopping for furniture? was developed. It was tested through an experiment on the sample drawn from the targeted population; generation Y, and measured quantitative through a model developed by Raska and Richter (2017) that measures purchase intentions through eight of the most commonly used factors in AR research. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that a product experience through an AR application can be equated to a product experience in real life, since no statistical difference in purchase intetnion was found between the groups. It was found that the respondents who experienced the chair through the AR application derived more hedonic value, while the respondents who experienced the chair in real life derived a higher level of product knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 110
Keywords [en]
Augmented reality, purchase intention, product experience, furniture, IKEA
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41506ISRN: JU-IHH-FÖA-2-20180760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-41506DiVA, id: diva2:1249434
Subject / course
JIBS, Business Administration
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 247 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf