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Medication management in municipality-based healthcare: A time and motion study of nurses
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Clinical Pharmacy, County Council of Jonkoping, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3221-9800
School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
2018 (English)In: Home Healthcare Now, ISSN 2374-4529, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this observational time and motion study was to increase our understanding of how nurses in home healthcare currently distribute their work time with a focus on the medication management process. The research was conducted in four municipalities in the southern part of Sweden. Participants were nurses working in home healthcare. The study measured proportion of time, comparison of proportions of time, proportion of time spent multitasking, and rate of interruptions per hour. Of total observed time, 20.4% was spent on medication management and of these tasks the highest proportion of time was spent on communications and dispensing medications. Nurses in nursing homes spent more time (23.0% vs. 17.4%, p = 0.001) on medication management than nurses in private homes. Nurses spent 47.9% of their time completing tasks with someone else, including patients, but had minimal interaction with prescribers. We observed a rate of 1.2 (95% CI 1.1-1.4) interruptions per hour on average and 30% of all interruptions occurred during medication management tasks. Nurses spent 3.7% of their time multitasking. Interruptions while performing medication-related tasks were common, as well as multitasking. Causes and consequences of the results need to be addressed in order to improve the safety of medication management for patients receiving municipality-based home care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018. Vol. 36, no 4, p. 238-246
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41140DOI: 10.1097/NHH.0000000000000671PubMedID: 29979305Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85049516407Local ID: HHJIMPROVEISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-41140DiVA, id: diva2:1238809
Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved

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