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Blowing up money? The earnings penalty of smoking in the 1970s and the 21st century
FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Stockholm, Sweden.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
2018 (English)In: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 60, p. 39-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We analyze the earnings penalty of smoking among Swedish twins in two social contexts: the 1970s, when smoking was common and widely accepted and when there were relatively few tobacco laws aiming to reduce smoking; and the 2000s, when smoking had become more expensive, stigmatizing and less common, and when tobacco laws and regulations had intensified. The results show that the short-term earnings penalty of smoking was much higher in the 21st century than in the 1970s for men. For women, smokers had on average higher annual earnings compared to nonsmokers in the 1970s, but lower annual earnings in the 2000s. In the long run, there was an earnings gap for men between never-smokers and continuous smokers, whereas there was a pronounced earnings ‘bonus’ of smoking cessation for women. The results emphasize the importance of social context and the long-term horizon when evaluating the consequences of smoking for earnings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 60, p. 39-52
Keywords [en]
Smoking; Earnings; Social context; Twins
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40411DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2018.05.003ISI: XYZPubMedID: 29909201Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048443732OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-40411DiVA, id: diva2:1218943
Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-15 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved

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Nystedt, Paul

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JIBS, EconomicsThe Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and WelfareHHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping)HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare)
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Journal of Health Economics
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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