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Factors that Influence Knowledge Transfer During the Successor’s Development in Family Firms: A Single Case Study
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background

Firms need to maximize the value of knowledge by transferring it over the organizations in order to generate and sustain competitive advantages. This is especially problematic for family firms where knowledge also has to be transmitted across generations to ensure continuity. Still, family firms inherit certain characteristics that have an effect on this process. First, family firms can predict succession long before the actual formal process. Thus, knowledge transfer can start early in the successor’s development. Second, family-involvement generates distinctive factors that may influence the actual transmission of knowledge during the successor’s development.

 

Purpose

This thesis intends to broaden the research field of knowledge transfer and the successor’s development in family firms. More specifically, the purpose of this thesis is to study factors that influence knowledge transfer during the successor’s development. 

 

Method

This is a qualitative single case study, executed by the means of interviews with four family members, whereas three of them were active in their family firm.  

 

Conclusion

The findings show a variety of factors that influence knowledge transfer during a successor’s development. The development can be categorized in three major steps. Trust and intergenerational relationships had an influence during the successor’s childhood and adolescence. In addition to intergenerational relationship, it was found that commitment to the family firm and the successor’s aspects and training had an effect during the successor’s academic studies / before entering the firm. The former four factors, as well as, conflict, predecessor’s involvement and organizational culture influenced knowledge transfer when the successor took active participation in the family firm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 53
Keywords [en]
Family Firms, Knowledge Transfer, Successor’s Development, Case Study
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39952ISRN: JU-IHH-FÖA-1-20180716OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-39952DiVA, id: diva2:1214697
Subject / course
JIBS, Business Administration
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-07-02 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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