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Achievement and participation in schools for young adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities: A cross-sectional study from the Southern part of Sweden
Hälsa och Habilitering, Region Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9597-039X
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Schools are expected to be an environment where children can reach their fullest potential and develop their talents, personality, as well as their mental and physical abilities. Children with disabilities often have restricted participation and lower achievement in school. The aim is to investigate if there are any differences in participation and achievement in school between adolescents, with and without self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities, and to explore the relations between achievement and participation. 

Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out based on data collected from 1520 adolescents in the sixth and seventh grade, from the south of Sweden. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to explore the relationship between having a neuropsychiatric disability, with participation and achievement, and how different factors affected this relationship. 

Results: Having a self-reported neuropsychiatric disability increases the likelihood of having restricted participation (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.89; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.99–4.23) and lower achievement in school (AOR: 2.94; 95% CI: 2.06–4.24). These adolescents were also more likely to have negative relationships to their teachers, be bullied, have poorer connectedness to their parents, come from families with less money, be trying drugs and be male, in comparison to the adolescents without a neuropsychiatric disability. The odds of having lower achievement increased with lower engagement and absenteeism from class. 

Conclusions: Adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities have a disadvantaged situation in school, and are exposed to factors that could have long-term negative effects. More longitudinal research is required to conclude what factors are causing restricted participation and low achievement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018.
Keywords [en]
Participation, achievement, adolescents, neuropsychiatric disabilities, school
National Category
Pediatrics Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39410DOI: 10.1177/1403494818788415ISI: XYZPubMedID: 30070167Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85052201143OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-39410DiVA, id: diva2:1205552
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-09-19

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