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Nursing work and sensory experiences of hospital design: A before and after qualitative study following a move to all-single room inpatient accommodation
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8781-6675
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2017 (English)In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 46, p. 121-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The embodied experience of nursing practice is rarely studied. Drawing on data from an internationally relevant larger study conducted in 2013–14, here we explore the sensory dimension of the embodied experiences of nursing staff working on two acute NHS hospital wards before and after a move to all-single room inpatient accommodation. We undertook a secondary analysis of 25 interviews with nursing staff (12 before and 13 after the move with half [13/25] using photographs taken by participants) from a mixed-method before-and-after study. This analysis focused on the sensory dimensions of nursing staff's experiences of their working practices and the effect of the built environment upon these. Drawing on Pallasmaa's theoretocal insights, we report how the all-single room ward design prioritises ‘focused vision’ and hinders peripheral perception, whilst the open ward environment is rich in contextual and preconscious information. We suggest all-single room accommodation may offer staff an impoverished experience of caring for patients and of working with each other. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017. Vol. 46, p. 121-129
Keyword [en]
Embodiment, Healthcare design, Nursing work, Patient experience, Staff experience, design, health care, health worker, hospital sector, management practice, perception, Article, controlled study, cost, hospital design, human, human dignity, national health service, nurse patient relationship, nursing care, nursing staff, patient preference, patient safety, priority journal, privacy, qualitative research, quasi experimental study, surgical ward, teamwork, United Kingdom, vision, work environment, workload
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38561DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.05.001ISI: 000407404500016PubMedID: 28527327Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85019909107Local ID: HHJIMPROVEISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-38561DiVA, id: diva2:1174624
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved

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Robert, Glenn

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