Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Secondary school science teachers’ arguments for the particulate nature of matter
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2199-1627
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF).
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, E-ISSN 1098-2736, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 503-525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How do secondary school science teachers justify the model of a particulate nature of matter, and how do the arguments they use relate to historical arguments? To find out, we individually interviewed 11 in-service secondary school science teachers (certified to teach chemistry and/or physics in secondary school, and with 2–30 years of teaching experience) regarding their arguments for the particulate nature of matter and experiments that could demonstrate the existence of particles. The collected data were qualitatively analyzed. Three qualitatively different categories of arguments could be constructed from data: philosophical argumentsindirect experimental arguments, and direct experimental arguments. The indirect experimental arguments, which is the largest category, could be further divided into qualitatively different subcategories: non-specific research and experiments, and chemical, physical and subatomic experiments. Even though several experiments and arguments were suggested by the informants in our study, the arguments regarding the validity of the experiments were quite uncertain and vague. The experiments and arguments were used to corroborate the particulate nature of matter and taken for granted in advance rather than used to justify a model with particles. The outcome was discussed in relation to scientific arguments and experiments and in view of results from previous science education research. Based on our data, teacher education and in-service teacher training, as well as teacher guides, were suggested to be more elaborate regarding contemporary knowledge, with direct experimental evidence for the particulate nature of matter being presented. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018. Vol. 55, no 4, p. 503-525
Keywords [en]
chemistry education, particulate nature of matter, secondary school, teachers’ arguments
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38456DOI: 10.1002/tea.21428ISI: 000427126100002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85034215273OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-38456DiVA, id: diva2:1172972
Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Gunnarsson, RobertHellquist, Björn

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gunnarsson, RobertHellquist, Björn
By organisation
HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF)School of Education and Communication
In the same journal
Journal of Research in Science Teaching
Didactics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 265 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf